Since faith is one, it must be professed in all its purity and integrity". Pope Francis/Pope Benedict

Email: torontocatholicwitness@outlook.com

Sunday, 28 April 2019

The fuss around Divine Mercy Sunday has to stop - especially for the "true traditionalists!"


Today is Divine Mercy Sunday, in the New Rite.

Last year, a post on this topic was posted on Vox Cantoris. In the comment section, I stated that I never got into the devotion, both because I never had a personal interest in it, and because I found the seeming hysteria around it a bit off-putting. (I am uneasy with elevated emotions and crowds.) I daresay I was thinking if you practiced the devotion you were not a "true" Catholic.

That was before I realized I was consorting with a group of people who were not interested in propelling me to authentic virtue, and were instead teaching me to set myself against everyone else in a way which fostered uncharity.

Since then, my hostility towards the Divine Mercy devotion has decreased dramatically.

I still harbor some questions about the humility of St. Faustina in writing her diary and the intentions of her spiritual director, Fr. Sopocko, in promoting the devotion so heavily almost immediately after learning about the visions. But that is what they are. Questions based on what I can read in the historical record. I am unable to read their souls and see things, how they actually were. That is God's province alone, and besides, they are dead now. I can only hope they are in a good place now.

Plus, there is a reason that it was banned in the first place, its original image heavily criticized, and its theology questionable. I also still hold those concerns, as they are part of the devotion's history. It is why I do not practice it.

But let me say this.

I don't care if you practice it or not.

You can practice the Divine Mercy chaplet and still be a "traditional" Catholic, much as I dislike using the term.

Or you can practice another devotion. There are a myriad of devotions out there. 

A fuss seems to be made out of the Divine Mercy devotion in particular, not only because of its history and its image, but because most "traditionalists" are melanholics to some degree, and melanholics resist any notion of mercy. It's a failing of the temperament: they fail to see the good in themselves, so they internalize the sense of God's judgement at the expense of His mercy

Moreover, people seem to presume that if you pray the Divine Mercy chaplet, you must think a certain way - ie. you get "a get out of jail free" card for purgatory, and have a really skewed sense of God's mercy at the expense of His judgement. There seems to be a sentiment that you're going to Hell, too, as you've got it all wrong regarding God's mercy. As I said, presumptive. Not to mention totally bone-headed.

This is my third time seeing the cacophony around Divine Mercy Sunday. Usually, they say the third time is the charm, but seeing it again has alerted me to the fact that perhaps people kick up such a fuss about it for the mere pleasure of saying they are the "true" Catholics.

Call me presumptive. I don't care.

No one is preserved from Hell because they practice a particular devotion. Just last night, in fact, I read that, per commentary made by St. Alphonsus Ligouri, one can commit mortal sins even while doing the Rosary or other devotions.

Makes you think, doesn't it?

People go to Hell because of the mortal sins they commit, not because of the devotion they practice. 

Divine Mercy .... but are we listening?



BENEDICT XVI
REGINA CÆLI

II Sunday of Easter, 23 April 2006

Dear Brothers and Sisters,

This Sunday the Gospel of John tells us that the Risen Jesus appeared to the disciples, enclosed in the Upper Room, on the evening of the "first day of the week" (Jn 20: 19), and that he showed himself to them once again in the same place "eight days later" (Jn 20: 26). From the beginning, therefore, the Christian community began to live a weekly rhythm, marked by the meeting with the Risen Lord.

This is something that the Constitution on the Liturgy of the Second Vatican Council also emphasizes, saying: "By a tradition handed down from the Apostles, which took its origin from the very day of Christ's Resurrection, the Church celebrates the Paschal Mystery every seventh day, which day is appropriately called the Lord's Day" (Sacrosanctum Concilium, n. 106).

The Evangelist further recalls that on the occasion of both his appearances - the day of the Resurrection and eight days later - the Lord Jesus showed the disciples the signs of the crucifixion, clearly visible and tangible even in his glorified Body (cf. Jn 20: 20, 27).

Those sacred wounds in his hands, in his feet and in his side, are an inexhaustible source of faith, hope and love from which each one can draw, especially the souls who thirst the most for divine mercy.

In consideration of this, the Servant of God John Paul II, highlighting the spiritual experience of a humble Sister, St Faustina Kowalska, desired that the Sunday after Easter be dedicated in a special way to Divine Mercy; and Providence disposed that he would die precisely on the eve of this day in the hands of Divine Mercy.


The mystery of God's merciful love was the centre of the Pontificate of my venerable Predecessor. Let us remember in particular his 1980 Encyclical Dives in Misericordia, and his dedication of the new Shrine of Divine Mercy in Krakow in 2002. The words he spoke on the latter occasion summed up, as it were, his Magisterium, pointing out that the cult of Divine Mercy is not a secondary devotion but an integral dimension of Christian faith and prayer.

May Mary Most Holy, Mother of the Church, whom we now address with the Regina Caeli, obtain for all Christians that they live Sunday to the full as "the Easter of the week", tasting the beauty of the encounter with the Risen Lord and drawing from the source of his merciful love to be apostles of his peace.

Friday, 26 April 2019

Catholics need to know their History!

With the spread of liberalism, secularism, neo-paganism, and every "ism" except belief in Our Lord Jesus Christ and His Church, perhaps as we approach the end of Easter Week, we should take account of how far we have fallen. 

Perhaps it is time for us to learn some history of the Church? 


Thursday, 25 April 2019

Why I no longer subscribe to the idea of "true" traditionalism


Earlier this year, I began writing a series on the problem of "true" traditionalism, starting with a post directly countering the claim that there such a thing as a "true" traditionalist. That was quietly followed by a post which questioned the distinction between "true" and "false" traditionalists, based on conversations I had seen on Twitter.

At the beginning of Lent, I posted a piece directly countering the "counter-revolutionary" position, detailing what holders of that position believe. That earned me a stinging rebuke from someone whom I suspect I used to know, and encouraged me to keep writing, for it was clearly a problematic philosophy, enough for someone to almost immediately go on the defensive as soon as the post was published.

Unfortunately, I posted the piece the same day St. Michael's College School in Toronto officially endorsed sodomy, and it was decided that my series would have to wait, for it was not as pressing as sodomy. Lent soon ensued, and I was taken up with other business, least of all dealing with the negative effects of the endorsement of sodomy in my home.

Easter is now here, and with it, a sense of clarity. I held off on publishing the rest of my series during Lent, not just on account of the penitential nature of the season, but also because I held on to some (perhaps foolish) hope that the local counter-revolutionaries would come to realize that their position was foolish, and apologize for disparaging those who were not their particular brand of traditionalist. This hope was not fulfilled, as I sadly realized on the Easter Vigil.

For that, friends, is why I am exerting the effort to put this series together. I once considered myself a "true" traditionalist. A counter-revolutionary. I am someone who has a historical bent, and for several months, enticed by the wealth of supposed historical evidence available, I firmly reasoned that the problems with society began with the introduction of humanism in the 13th century. However, I also participated - to my regret - in the direct disparaging of individuals in the Toronto community. Not calling them names, exactly, but calling their adherence to Tradition into question based on what I perceived their Tradition-defying actions to be, in a most uncharitable manner.

It came to a breaking point this past November. Six months ago. The mind can only justify so much sin, and that month, my conscience was tweaked. Events went on as they did, and my Lent was much quieter than it was in previous years, to say the least.

Subsequently, I no longer subscribe to the tenets of "true" traditionalism, be they couched in the name of sedevacantism or counter-revolutionary. For me, associating with these "true" traditionalists were occasions of sin, for I gossiped (or listened to gossip) about people who have done great work for the Toronto traditional Mass community. Not just laypeople, but even a priest. I no longer associate with these so-called "true" traditionalists, not only because I find their ideas foolish, but because I find their behavior reprehensible and without justification.

Perhaps if I had had a different sort of experience, or a less sensitive conscience, I would not be writing what I am now. But it is what it is. And it is not a problem confined to the Toronto Archdiocese, sadly. I have seen it in Britain and America, amongst other places.

True traditionalism does not exist. It never did. Not now. Not in the 1400s. Not in the 1960s. It is a placebo designed to make people think they are fighting when they are in fact enabling the revolutionaries, the abusers and Lord knows who else to destroy the Church from within.

There will be those who argue that by writing this series, I am contributing to the problem. Causing division and disunity. That may be the case. I don't know, and I know people will come to their own conclusions about what I am writing.

But this search for "true" traditionalism is problematic. That I can say. If my series leads someone to seriously consider the falsehood of "true" traditionalism, I have done my duty.

Tuesday, 23 April 2019

ARE CANADIANS CALLING DOWN GOD'S DAMNATION ? ~ What happens to a Nation that glories in Sin?



Will God in His Justice strike down this accursed country, Canada? 

Founded in the 1600s by devout Frenchmen, a Catholic civilization, "France in America",  was gradually built. Superior to the protestant English colonies in every way, Quebec was a glorious Catholic jewel. 

Sadly, she was conquered by the wretched heretics in 1759 on the Plains of Abraham. Nonetheless, Les Canadiens resisted, led by the the Catholic Church. In a noxious spiritual poison of Anglo-Saxon protestantism and Freemasonry, Les Habitants de Quebec remained faithful to Christ and His Church. 

But something happened. The spiritual pride of Les Canadiens, of being the self-appointed "converters" of the wayward protestants of North America fell by the wayside, as the elite seminarians of French Canada were sent off to Europe to the "best" seminaries. 

By the time these bright young men of Quebec returned from Europe they had been transformed from devout Catholics into rank Modernists. Soon the days of Brother Andre and the holy saintly nuns of Catholic Quebec would be gone. 

The new spiritual poison of Modernism, injected into Canada in the 40s and 50s, led to the "Quiet Revolution", that would result in the near complete demolition of the Catholic Church within a few short years. By the late 1960s, Quebec was a hive of radicalism and secularism. 

What invading, foreign protestants could not achieve in 200 years, apostate Quebecois achieved in less than 10 years. Quebec had fallen from a Catholic bastion to the most virulently secular and anti-clerical state in all of North America. 

The Quiet Revolution produced such deviant, apostate politicians and business leaders as: Pierre Elliot Trudeau, Rene Levesque, Jean Chretien, Marc Lalonde, Jacques Parizeau, Lucien Bouchard, Paul Demarais, Brian Mulroney, Gilles Duceppe, Paul Martin, Francois Legault...and the list of goes on and on.... and now: Justin Trudeau.  Justin of "Canada 2020" and the godless globalism. Make no mistake friends, politics always comes down to religion, and the ultimate question asked by Christ: “whom do you say I am"? (Matt 16:13). 

Trudeau Junior, is, in fact, so demonic, so viciously anti-Christian, that even his wayward father would blush with shame. But here we are. 


Homosexual activists gather in Ottawa to unveil "gay" coin

Today, is a day that will live in infamy, along with the dark days that legalized pornography, abortion, sodomy and euthanasia. 

Today, homosexual activity is officially glorified on a one dollar coin, issued from the Royal Canadian Mint. 

What can I say? What words are fitting for this spiritual crime, this blasphemy against God?


"Whosoever therefore resisteth the power, resisteth the ordinance of God: and they that resist shall receive to themselves damnation".
(Rm 13:2) 

In fact, God is only damning Canada, because Canadians wish it to be so, as they are "resisting" His power, His "ordinance". Just as a man throws himself in Hell of his own choosing, so Canadians, through apathy, stupidity, indifference, hedonism, heresy and a pure hatred of God, are calling down His judgement. 

God will not be mocked (Gal 6:7). How many abortions have taken place in this country? God is a just God. Just as the stiff necked Jews were punished and sent into exile in Babylon, so too Canada will be punished. 

Do Canadians want to be damned? It seems so. There is constant promotion and even the glorification of sin. "He that soweth iniquity shall reap evils, and with the rod of his anger he shall be consumed." (Proverbs 22:8). 

If this continues without public repentance and reparation, God will damn this country to which once so much was given. Canada was once a Catholic Nation. Now, she is in the forefront of vicious, anti-Catholic neo-pagan totalitarian States. 

The question is: are we going to hear from Canada's bishops? What they do, or do not do, will tell us not only who they are, but where this country is headed in the future. The silence of Canada's bishops only signals a further descent into darkness.

BREAKING: Gay-friendly Canadian PM Justin Trudeau has gay sex coin issued!



Well, lookie here.

Gay-friendly Canadian PM Justin Trudeau has used our valuable tax dollars to issue a coin calling for the decriminalizaiton of homosexuality in Canada.

Shall we - including Andrew Scheer - include embezzlement of tax money to his crimes?

Is Prime Minister Trudeau gay? I mean, we certainly have seen him at practically every Pride parade held since he became Prime Minister. That's a lot of jets.




I wonder what his wife and children think of this.

Oh, wait!


They must know the big secret about Daddy.

Whiskey tango foxtrot is going on with our country?

Wednesday, 17 April 2019

Office of Tenebrae - Maundy Thursday

On this and the two following days, the Church anticipates the Night-Office; she celebrates it on the previous evening of each day, and this in order that the Faithful may be present at it. The Matins and Lauds of Maundy Thursday are, therefore, said this afternoon. The Faithful should make every effort to assist at this solemn Office, seeing it is on their account that the Church has changed her usual hours. As to the merit there is in joining in it, there can be no doubt, but that it is to be preferred to any private devotions. The surest means for obtaining favours from God, and winning him to our requests, is to approach him through the Church. And as regards the feelings of devotion wherewith we ought to celebrate the mysteries of these three great Days, the Offices of the Church are, ordinarily speaking, a surer and richer source than the Exercises of Piety composed by men. The soul that feeds on the words and ceremonies of the holy Liturgy, will be all the more disposed to profit by the private devotions she practises at home. The prayer of the Church will thus become the basis, whereon is built the edifice of christian piety during these glorious Anniversaries of our Redemption; and we shall be imitating our forefathers who lived in the Ages of Faith, and who were such admirable Christians, because they lived the life of the Church, by means of the sacred Liturgy. 
The Office of Tenebrae for to-day is given below, on Maundy Thursday; the " Night Office".

Spy Wednesday

The Chief Priests and the Ancients of the people, are met to-day, in one of the rooms adjoining the Temple, for the purpose of deliberating on the best means of putting Jesus to death. Several plans are discussed. Would it be prudent to lay hands upon him at this season of the Feast of the Pasch, when the City is filled with strangers, who have received a favourable impression of Jesus from the solemn ovation given to him three days back? Then, too, are there not a great number of the inhabitants of Jerusalem, who took part in that triumph, and whose enthusiastic admiration of Jesus might excite them to rise up in his defence? These considerations persuade them not to have recourse to any violent measure, at least for the present, as a sedition among the people might be the consequence, and its promoters, even were they to escape being ill-treated by the people, would be brought before the tribunal of the Roman Governor, Pontius Pilate. They, therefore, come to the resolution of letting the Feast pass quietly over, before apprehending Jesus. 
But these blood-thirsty men are making all these calculations as though they were the masters. They are, if they will, shrewd assassins, who put off their murder to a more convenient day: but the Divine decrees, - which, from all eternity, have prepared a Sacrifice for the world's salvation, — have fixed "ttiAa very year's Pasch as the day of the Sacrifice, and, to-morrow evening, the holy City will re-echo with the trumpets, which proclaim the opening of the Feast. The figurative Lamb is now to make way for the true one; the Pasch of this year will substitute the reality for the type; and Jesus' Blood, shed by the hands of wicked priests, is soon to flow simultaneously with that of victims, which have only been hitherto acceptable to God, because they prefigured the Sacrifice of Calvary. The Jewish priesthood is about to be its own executioner, by immolating Him, whose Blood is to abrogate the Ancient Alliance, and perpetuate the New one. 
But how are Jesus' enemies to get possession of their divine Victim, so as to avoid a disturbance in the City? There is only one plan that could succeed, and they have not thought of it: it is treachery. Just at the close of their deliberations, they are told that one of Jesus' Disciples seeks admission. They admit him, and he says to them: What will you give me, and I will deliver him unto you?^ They are delighted at this proposition: and yet, how is it, that they, doctors of the law, forget that this infamous bargain between themselves and Judas has all been foretold by David, in the 108th Psalm? They know the Scriptures from beginning to end; — how comes it, that they forget the words of the Prophet, who even mentions the sum of thirty pieces of silver.^ Judas asks them what they will give him; and they give him thirty pieces of silver! All is arranged: to-morrow, Jesus will be in Jerusalem, eating the Pasch with his Disciples. In the evening, he will go, as usual, to the Garden on Mount Olivet. But how shall they, who are sent to seize him, be able to dis- tinguish him from his Disciples? Judas will lead the way; he will show them which is Jesus, by going up to him and kissing him!
^ 8t Matth. xxvi. 15. • Icfem, xxvii. 9. Zach. xi. 12.

Such is the impious scheme devised on this day, within the precincts of the Temple of Jerusalem. To testify her detestation at it, and to make atonement to the Son of God for the outrage thus offered him, the Holy Church, from the earliest ages, consecrated the Wednesday of every week to penance. In our own times, the Fast of Lent begins on a Wednesday; and when the Church ordained that we should commence each of the four Seasons of the year with Fasting, Wednesday was chosen to be one of the three days thus consecrated to bodily mortification. 
On this day, in the Roman Church, was held the sixth Scrutiny, for the admission of Catechumens to Baptism. Those, upon whom there had been previous doubts, were now added to the number of the chosen ones, if they were found worthy. There were two Lessons read in the Mass, as on the day of the great Scrutiny, the Wednesday of the fourth Week of Lent. As usual, the Catechumens left the Church, after the Gospel; but, as soon as the Holy Sacrifice was over, they were brought back by the Door- Keeper, and one of the Priests addressed them in these words: " On Saturday next, the Eve of Easter, " at avAih an hour, you will assemble in the Lateran "Basilica, for the seventh Scrutiny; you will then " recite the Symbol, which you must have learned; "and lastly, you will receive, by God's help, the " sacred laver of regeneration. Prepare yourselves, "zealously and humbly, by persevering fasts and " prayers, in order that, having been buried, by this " holy Baptism, together with Jesus Christ, you may " rise again with him, unto life everlasting. Amen."
At Rome, the Station for to-day is in the Basilica of Saint Mary Major. Lot us compassionate with our Holy Mother, whose Heart is filled with poignant grief at the foresight of the Sacrifice, which is preparing.
From Dom Prosper Gueranger's commentary on Spy Wednesday in The Liturgical Year

Tuesday, 16 April 2019

Tuesday in Holy Week

To-day, again, our Saviour sets out in the morning for Jerusalem. His intention is to repair to the temple, and continue his yesterday's teachings. It is evident that his mission on earth is fast drawing to its close. He says to his Disciples: You know that after two days shall be the Pasch, and the Son of Man shall be delivered up to be crucified. [St Matth., xxvi. 2]. 
On the road from Bethania to Jerusalem, the Disciples are surprised at seeing the fig-tree, which their Divine Master had yesterday cursed, now dead. Addressing himself to Jesus, Peter says: Rabbi, behold, the fig-tree, which thou didst curse, is withered away? [St Mark, xi. 21]. In order to teach us that the whole of material nature is subservient to the spiritual element, when this last is united to God by faith, - Jesus replies: Rave the faith of God. Amen I say to you, that whosoever shall say to this mountain: Be thou removed and cast into the sea! and shall not stagger in his heart, but believe, that whatsoever he saith shall be done, it shall be done unto him [St Mark xi,22, 23]. 
Having entered the City, Jesus directs his steps towards the Temple. No sooner has he entered, than the Chief Priests, the Scribes, and the Ancients of the people, accost him with these words: By what authority dost thou these things? [St Mark, xi. 28] and who has given thee this authority, that thou shouldst do these things? We shall find our Lord's answer given in the Gospel. Our object is to mention the leading events of the last days of our Redeemer on earth; the holy Volume will supply the details.
As on the two preceding days, Jesus leaves the City towards evening: he passes over Mount Olivet, and returns to Bethania, where he finds his Blessed Mother and his devoted friends. 
In to-day's Mass, the Church reads the history of the Passion according to St. Mark, who wrote his Gospel the next after St. Matthew: hence it is, that the second place is assigned to him. His account of the Passion is shorter than St. Matthew's, of which it would often seem to be a summary; and yet certain details are peculiar to this Evangelist, and prove him to have been an eye-witness. Our readers are aware that St. Mark was the disciple of St. Peter, and that his Gospel was written under the very eye of the Prince of the Apostles. 
In Rome, the Station for to-day is in the Church of St. Prisca, which is said to have been the house of Aquila and his wife Prisca, to whom St Paul sends his salutations, in his Epistle to the Romans, In the 3rd century, Pope St. Eutychian had translated thither, on account of the sameness of the name, the body of St. Prisca, a Virgin and Martyr of Rome.
From Dom Prosper Gueranger's commentary on Tuesday in Holy Week in The Liturgical Year

Monday, 15 April 2019

Monday in Holy Week


This morning, also, Jesus goes with his Disciples to Jerusalem. He is fasting, for the Gospel tells us, that he was hungry [St Matth. xxi. 18]. He approaches a fig-tree, which is by the way-side; but finds nothing on it, save leaves only. Jesus, wishing to give us an instruction, curses the fig-tree, which immediately withers away. He would hereby teach us what they are to expect, who have nothing but good desires, and never produce in themselves the fruit of a real conversion. Nor is the allusion to Jerusalem less evident. This City is zealous for the exterior of Divine Worship; but her heart is hard and obstinate, and she is plotting, at this very hour, the death of the Son of God. 
The greater portion of the day is spent in the Temple, where Jesus holds long conversations with the Chief Priests and Ancients of the people. His language to them is stronger than ever, and triumphs over all their captious questions. It is principally in the Gospel of St. Matthew [Chapters xxi. xxii. and xxiii.] that we shall find these answers of our Redeemer, which so energetically accuse the Jews of their sin of rejecting the Messias, and so plainly foretell the punishment their sin is to bring after it. 
At length, Jesus leaves the Temple, and takes the road that leads to Bethania. Having come as far as Mount Olivet, which commands a view of Jerusalem, he sits down, and rests awhile. The Disciples make this an opportunity for asking him, how soon the chastisements he has been speaking of in the Temple will come upon the City. His answer comprises two events: the destruction of Jerusalem, and the final destruction of the world. He thus teaches them that the first is a figure of the second. The time when each is to happen, is to be when the measure of iniquity is filled up. But, with regard to the chastisement that is to befall Jerusalem, he gives this more definite answer: 'Amen I say to you: this generation shall not pass, till all these things be done.' [St Matth. xxiv 34.] History tells us how this prophecy of Jesus was fulfilled: forty years had scarcely elapsed after his Ascension when the Roman army encamped on this very place where he is now speaking to his Disciples, and laid siege to the ungrateful and wicked City. After giving a prophetic description of that Last Judgment, which is to rectify all the unjust judgments of men, he leaves Mount Olivet, returns to Bethania, and consoles the anxious heart of his most holy Mother. 
The Station, at Rome, is in the Church of Saint Praxedes. It was in this Church, that Pope Paschal the Second, in the 9th century, placed two thousand three hundred bodies of holy Martyrs, which he had ordered to be taken out of the Catacombs. The Pillar, to which our Saviour was tied during his scourging, is also here.
From Dom Prosper Gueranger's commentary on Monday in Holy Week in The Liturgical Year. 

Sunday, 14 April 2019

Sacrilege at St. Joseph's Parish in Ottawa: illicit matter is being used for "hosts" for "Mass"



It has been brought to the attention of this blog, that St. Joseph's parish, in Ottawa is using illicit matter for hosts at Mass. An email (see above) confirms that illicit "wheat free..." wafers are being used for those faithful who suffer from Celiac Disease. The practice at St. Joseph's is to consecrate valid hosts, whilst at the same Mass also simulating the non-consecration of "wheat free..." wafers. 

The use of illicit matter renders such Masses sacrilegious and blasphemous. 

Such Masses consist of the priest (alongside consecrating licit matter into the Body of Christ) knowingly simulating the non-consecration of de facto "cookies" for "worship" by faithful who are ignorant of the non-consecration.

This is an abomination. The gravity of this spiritual crime cannot be underestimated. 

The Consecration of valid hosts is mocked and profaned with the invalid wafers lying alongside on the Altar. The faithful are deprived of the Real Presence and objectively tricked into worshiping a mere piece of food. 




For the valid consecration of the host, wheat MUST be used. And wheat ONLY. 

Can.  924 §1. The most holy eucharistic sacrifice must be offered with bread and with wine in which a little water must be mixed. 
§2. The bread must be only wheat and recently made so that there is no danger of spoiling.

How long has this abomination been going on for? 

How long have the faithful been given a wafer made of rice and potato starch to worship as the "Real Presence"? 

Are there other parishes across Canada that hold such sacrilegious and blasphemous "Masses"? 

If one parish is doing it, could not others? If only illicit matter is used for a "Mass", it would be rendered completely invalid. 

Catholics have a right to know


The Archbishop of Ottawa can be reached at:

Most Rev. Terrence Prendergast., S. J. 
1247 Kilborn Place
Ottawa, ON K1H 6K9
Tel: (613) 738-5025
Fax number: 613-738-0130
Twitter:@archterentius
Archdiocese on Twitter:@ArchOttawa

The Papal Nuncio can be reached at: 

Most Rev. Luigi Bonazzi
724 Manor Ave.
Ottawa, ON K1M 0E3
Canada
Tel: 613.746.4914
Fax: 613.746.4786
email: nuntiatura@nuntiatura.ca



An example of a "gluten free, wheat free.." illicit "wafer". 




 The solution is very simple. Those faithful who suffer from Celiac Disease can be given the Precious Blood from a small chalice. 

Hosanna Sunday


Early in the morning of this day, Jesus sets out for Jerusalem, leaving Mary His Mother, and the two sisters Martha and Mary Magdalene, and Lazarus, at Bethania. The Mother of sorrows trembles at seeing her Son thus expose Himself to danger, for His enemies are bent upon His destruction; but it is not death, it is triumph, that Jesus is to receive to-day in Jerusalem. The Messias, before being nailed to the cross, is to be proclaimed King by the people of the great city; the little children are to make her streets echo with their Hosannas to the Son of David; and this in presence of the soldiers of Rome’s emperor, and of the high priests and Pharisees: the first standing under the banner of their eagles; the second, dumb with rage. 
The prophet Zachary had foretold this triumph which the Son of Man was to receive a few days before His Passion, and which had been prepared for Him from all eternity. ‘Rejoice greatly, O daughter of Sion! Shout for joy, O daughter of Jerusalem! Behold thy King will come to thee; the Just and the Saviour. He is poor, and riding upon an ass, and upon a colt, the foal of an ass.’ [Zach. ix. 9]. Jesus, knowing that the hour has come for the fulfilment of this prophecy, singles out two from the rest of His disciples, and bids them lead to Him an ass and her colt, which they would find not far off. He has reached Beth phage, on Mount Olivet. The two disciples lose no time in executing the order given them by their divine Master; and the ass and the colt are soon brought to the place where He stands. 
The holy fathers have explained to us the mystery of these two animals. The ass represents the Jewish people, which had been long under the yoke of the Law; the colt, upon which, as the evangelist says, no man yet hath sat [St. Mark xi. 2], is a figure of the Gentile world, which no one had ever yet brought into subjection. The future of these two peoples is to be decided a few days hence: the Jews will be rejected, for having refused to acknowledge Jesus as the Messias; the Gentiles will take their place, to be adopted as God’s people, and become docile and faithful. 
The disciples spread their garments upon the colt; and our Saviour, that the prophetic figure might be fulfilled, sits upon him [Ibid. 7, and St. Luke xix. 35.], and advances towards Jerusalem. As soon as it is known that Jesus is near the city, the holy Spirit works in the hearts of those Jews, who have come from all parts to celebrate the feast of the Passover. They go out to meet our Lord, holding palm branches in their hands, and loudly proclaiming Him to be King [St. Luke xix. 38]. They that have accompanied Jesus from Bethania, join the enthusiastic crowd. Whilst some spread their garments on the way, others cut down boughs from the palm-trees, and strew them along the road. Hosanna is the triumphant cry, proclaiming to the whole city that Jesus, the Son of David, has made His entrance as her King. 
Thus did God, in His power over men’s hearts, procure a triumph for His Son, and in the very city which, a few days later, was to clamour for His Blood. This day was one of glory to our Jesus, and the holy Church would have us renew, each year, the memory of this triumph of the Man-God. Shortly after the birth of our Emmanuel, we saw the Magi coming from the extreme east, and looking in Jerusalem for the King of the Jews, to whom they intended offering their gifts and their adorations: but it is Jerusalem herself that now goes forth to meet this King. Each of these events is an acknowledgment of the kingship of Jesus; the first, from the Gentiles; the second, from the Jews. Both were to pay Him this regal homage, before He suffered His Passion. The inscription to be put upon the cross, by Pilate’s order, will express the kingly character of the Crucified: Jesus of Nazareth, King of the Jews. Pilate, the Roman governor, the pagan, the base coward, has been unwittingly the fulfiller of a prophecy; and when the enemies of Jesus insist on the inscription being altered, Pilate will not deign to give them any answer but this: ‘What I have written, I have written.’ To-day, it is the Jews themselves that proclaim Jesus to be their King: they will soon be dispersed, in punishment for their revolt against the Son of David; but Jesus is King, and will be so for ever. Thus were literally verified the words spoken by the Archangel to Mary, when he announced to her the glories of the Child that was to be born of her: ‘The Lord God shall give unto Him the throne of David, His father; and He shall reign in the house of Jacob for ever.’ [St. Luke i. 32]. Jesus begins His reign upon the earth this very day; and though the first Israel is soon to disclaim His rule, a new Israel, formed from the faithful few of the old, shall rise up in every nation of the earth, and become the kingdom of Christ, a kingdom such as no mere earthly monarch ever coveted in his wildest fancies of ambition. 
This is the glorious mystery which ushers in the great week, the week of dolours. Holy Church would have us give this momentary consolation to our heart, and hail our Jesus as our King. She has so arranged the service of to-day, that it should express both joy and sorrow; joy, by uniting herself with the loyal hosannas of the city of David; and sorrow, by compassionating the Passion of her divine Spouse. The whole function is divided into three parts, which we will now proceed to explain. 
The first is the blessing of the palms; and we may have an idea of its importance from the solemnity used by the Church in this sacred rite. One would suppose that the holy Sacrifice has begun, and is going to be offered up in honour of Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem. Introit, Collect, Epistle, Gradual, Gospel, even a Preface, are said, as though we were, as usual, preparing for the immolation of the spotless Lamb; but, after the triple Sanctus! Sanctus! Sanctus! the Church suspends these sacrificial formulas, and turns to the blessing of the palms. The prayers she uses for this blessing are eloquent and full of instruction; and, together with the sprinkling with holy water and the incensation, impart a virtue to these branches, which elevates them to the supernatural order, and makes them means for the sanctification of our souls and the protection of our persons and dwellings. The faithful should hold these palms in their hands during the procession, and during the reading of the Passion at Mass, and keep them in their homes as an outward expression of their faith, and as a pledge of God’s watchful love. 
It is scarcely necessary to tell our reader that the palms or olive branches, thus blessed, are carried in memory of those wherewith the people of Jerusalem strewed the road, as our Saviour made His triumphant entry; but a word on the antiquity of our ceremony will not be superfluous. It began very early in the east. It is probable that, as far as Jerusalem itself is concerned, the custom was established immediately after the ages of persecution. St. Cyril, who was bishop of that city in the fourth century, tells us that the palm-tree, from which the people cut the branches when they went out to meet our Saviour, was still to be seen in the vale of Cedron [Cateches. x. versus fin.] Such a circumstance would naturally suggest an annual commemoration of the great event. In the following century, we find this ceremony established, not only in the churches of the east, but also in the monasteries of Egypt and Syria. At the beginning of Lent, many of the holy monks obtained permission from their abbots to retire into the desert, that they might spend the sacred season in strict seclusion; but they were obliged to return to their monasteries for Palm Sunday, as we learn from the life of Saint Euthymius, written by his disciple Cyril [Act. SS. Jan. 20]. In the west, the introduction of this ceremony was more gradual; the first trace we find of it is in the sacramentary of St. Gregory, that is, at the end of the sixth, or the beginning of the seventh, century. When the faith had penetrated into the north, it was not possible to have palms or olive branches; they were supplied by branches from other trees. The beautiful prayers used in the blessing, and based on the mysteries expressed by the palm and olive trees, are still employed in the blessing of our willow, box, or other branches; and rightly, for these represent the symbolical ones which nature has denied us. 
The second of to-day’s ceremonies is the procession, which comes immediately after the blessing of the palms. It represents our Saviour’s journey to Jerusalem, and His entry into the city. To make it the more expressive, the branches that have just been blessed are held in the hand during it. With the Jews, to hold a branch in one’s hand was a sign of joy. The divine law had sanctioned this practice, as we read in the following passage from Leviticus, where God commands His people to keep the feast of tabernacles: And you shall take to you, on the first day, the fruits of the fairest tree, and branches of palm-trees, and boughs of thick trees, and willows of the brook, and you shall rejoice before the Lord your God [Lev. xxiii. 40]. It was, therefore, to testify their delight at seeing Jesus enter within their walls, that the inhabitants, even the little children, of Jerusalem, went forth to meet Him with palms in their hands. Let us, also, go before our King, singing our hosannas to Him as the conqueror of death, and the liberator of His people.
During the middle ages, it was the custom, in many churches, to carry the book of the holy Gospels in this procession. The Gospel contains the words of Jesus Christ, and was considered to represent Him. The procession halted at an appointed place, or station: the deacon then opened the sacred volume, and sang from it the passage which describes our Lord’s entry into Jerusalem. This done, the cross which, up to this moment, was veiled, was uncovered; each of the clergy advanced towards it, venerated it, and placed at its foot a small portion of the palm he held in his hand. The procession then returned, preceded by the cross, which was left unveiled until all had re-entered the church. In England and Normandy, as far back as the eleventh century, there was practised a holy ceremony which represented, even more vividly than the one we have just been describing, the scene that was witnessed on this day at Jerusalem: the blessed Sacrament was carried in procession. The heresy of Berengarius, against the real presence of Jesus in the Eucharist, had been broached about that time; and the tribute of triumphant joy here shown to the sacred Host was a distant preparation for the feast and procession which were to be instituted at a later period. 
A touching ceremony was also practised in Jerusalem during to-day’s procession, and, like those just mentioned, was intended to commemorate the event related by the Gospel. The whole community of the Franciscans (to whose keeping the holy places are entrusted) went in the morning to Bethphage. There, the father guardian of the holy Land, being vested in pontifical robes, mounted upon an ass, on which garments were laid. Accompanied by the friars and the Catholics of Jerusalem, all holding palms in their hands, he entered the city, and alighted at the church of the holy sepulchre where Mass was celebrated with all possible solemnity. 
This beautiful ceremony, which dated from the period of the Latin kingdom in Jerusalem, has been forbidden, for now almost two hundred years, by the Turkish authorities of the city. 
We have mentioned these different usages, as we have done others on similar occasions, in order to aid the faithful to the better understanding of the several mysteries of the liturgy. In the present instance, they will learn that, in to-day’s procession, the Church wishes us to honour Jesus Christ as though He were really among us, and were receiving the humble tribute of our loyalty. Let us lovingly go forth to meet this our King, our Saviour, who comes to visit the daughter of Sion, as the prophet has just told us. He is in our midst; it is to Him that we pay honour with our palms: let us give Him our hearts too. He comes that He may be our King; let us welcome Him as such, and fervently cry out to Him: ‘Hosanna to the Son of David!’ 
At the close of the procession a ceremony takes place, which is full of the sublimest symbolism. On returning to the church, the doors are found to be shut. The triumphant procession is stopped; but the songs of joy are continued. A hymn in honour of Christ our King is sung with its joyous chorus; and at length the subdeacon strikes the door with the staff of the cross; the door opens, and the people, preceded by the clergy, enter the church, proclaiming the praise of Him, who is our resurrection and our life. 
This ceremony is intended to represent the entry of Jesus into that Jerusalem of which the earthly one was but the figure - the Jerusalem of heaven, which has been opened for us by our Saviour. The sin of our first parents had shut it against us; but Jesus, the King of glory, opened its gates by His cross, to which every resistance yields. Let us, then, continue to follow in the footsteps of the Son of David, for He is also the Son of God, and He invites us to share His kingdom with Him. Thus, by the procession, which is commemorative of what happened on this day, the Church raises up our thoughts to the glorious mystery of the Ascension, whereby heaven was made the close of Jesus’ mission on earth. Alas! the interval between these two triumphs of our Redeemer are not all days of joy; and no sooner is our procession over, than the Church, who had laid aside for a moment the weight of her grief, falls back into sorrow and mourning. 
The third part of to-day’s service is the offering of the holy Sacrifice. The portions that are sung by the choir are expressive of the deepest desolation; and the history of our Lord’s Passion, which is now to be read by anticipation, gives to the rest of the day that character of sacred gloom, which we all know so well. For the last five or six centuries, the Church has adopted a special chant for this narrative of the holy Gospel. The historian, or the evangelist, relates the events in a tone that is at once grave and pathetic; the words of our Saviour are sung to a solemn yet sweet melody, which strikingly contrasts with the high dominant of the several other interlocutors and the Jewish populace. During the singing of the Passion, the faithful should hold their palms in their hands, and, by this emblem of triumph, protest against the insults offered to Jesus by His enemies. As we listen to each humiliation and suffering, all of which were endured out of love for us, let us offer Him our palm as to our dearest Lord and King. When should we be more adoring, than when He is most suffering?
These are the leading features of this great day. According to our usual plan, we will add to the prayers and lessons any instructions that seem to be needed. 
This Sunday, besides its liturgical and popular appellation of Palm Sunday, has had several other names. Thus it was called Hosanna Sunday, in allusion to the acclamation wherewith the Jews greeted Jesus on His entry into Jerusalem. Our forefathers used also to call it Pascha Floridum, because the feast of the Pasch (or Easter), which is but eight days off, is to-day in bud, so to speak, and the faithful could begin from this Sunday to fulfil the precept of Easter Communion. It was in allusion to this name, that the Spaniards, having on the Palm Sunday of 1513, discovered the peninsula on the Gulf of Mexico, called itFlorida. We also find the name of Capililavium given to this Sunday, because, during those times when it was the custom to defer till Holy Saturday the baptism of infants born during the preceding months (where such a delay entailed no danger), the parents used, on this day, to wash the heads of these children, out of respect to the holy chrism wherewith they were to be anointed. Later on, this Sunday was, at least in some churches, called the Pasch of the competents, that is, of the catechumens, who were admitted to Baptism; they assembled to-day in the church, and received a special instruction on the symbol, which had been given to them in the previous scrutiny. In the Gothic Church of Spain, the symbol was not given till to-day. The Greeks call this Sunday Baïphoros, that is, Palm-bearing.
- From Dom Prosper Gueranger's commentary on Hosanna Sunday in The Liturgical Year.

Saturday, 13 April 2019

A Blessed Holy Week to all

We here at Toronto Catholic Witness would like to wish all here a Holy Week to come. 

In our day and age, it is all too easy to become consumed with Church politics while also forgetting who established it, and why.

The Week of Weeks puts that at the forefront. Take a break from Church politics - hard as it is! - and remember. Remember why we have Her, and why it was given to us, and how easily She has been abused over the centuries. Not just by Her ministers, but by us simple lay folk too. 

As it was so powerfully re-presented to me last night in watching The Passion of the Christ by Mel Gibson, we have all spat, kicked, beat, lashed, and otherwise abused Our Lord during His Passion. If not during it, certainly after it.

No one is innocent of sin, save the Sacrificial Lamb and His Mother. 


Sacred Triduum 2019 - UPDATED


A previous version of this poster stated the time for the Easter Vigil to begin at 7:30pm. That has now been amended to 7:00pm.

Thursday, 11 April 2019

Pope Bergoglio of Rome's miracle of kneeling and kissing - for politicians!


Here, as helpfully provided by Fr. Jimmy Martin of the Society of Judas, Pope Bergoglio of Rome is kissing the feet of South Sudan president Salva Kiir, praying and begging for peace in the troubled land.

I thought His Humbleness had one lung and severe knee problems that prevent him from kneeling - kneeling, even, for Our Lord Jesus Christ in the Blessed Sacrament!

If so, it's a modern-day miracle! The headlines blare: "POPE WHO CAN'T KNEEL FOR BLESSED SACRAMENT SUDDENLY KNEELS FOR POLITICIANS." Or something like that.

What was it Our Lord said about trusting princes and popes - nay, politicians - let alone grovelling to them? Hmm?

Oh, right. "Put your trust not in them." This even applies to Catholic ones, as I am told Kiir is.

As for the Pope - or should I say Antipope? 

... 

Do we even have to ask?

Thomas Merton - vow-leaving Trappist monk, woman-chaser ... martyr?

Well, this blew me over!

http://www.themartyrdomofthomasmerton.com/

People really are eager to perform canonizations, aren't they?

Is a man who quarreled with his superiors, chased a woman half his age while under his vows, and who died by accidental electrocution, a martyr?

You tell me. Not everything is a conspiracy. Sometimes, the facts speak for themselves.


Tuesday, 9 April 2019

Are we to apologize for speaking the Truth?


Most of us can point to several saints we hold in admiration for speaking the Truth and sticking to it, without apology, be they St. John of the Cross, St. Theresa of Avila, or St. Alphonsus Ligouri.

But how many of us actually imitate the saints we admire in this quality?

In our day and age, it seems as though the practice of this saintly attribute is lacking in most. No, I am not speaking of holding Error as Truth and sticking to that, though there are certainly many who do, be they as they may. I am speaking of speaking objective Truth and sticking to the Truth, despite all of the temptations that come our way to soften our words, go with the times, or other such things.

These are temptations I am becoming quite familiar with, on account of speaking out against my brother's open embrace of sodomy, both in person and in a straight-to-the-chase letter I sent to him. Just the other day, I was encouraged to write a different sort of letter, where I was to soften my tone and apologize for my earlier words, which were supposedly "condemning, judgmental, and personal" in my statements regarding my brother's sodomy. Almost immediately, I reasoned that while I would apologize for my tone, I would not apologize for what I ultimately wrote, for it was the Truth. I said so, and I was accused of, memorably, living in the 1700s while the rest of my family lives in the 2000s.

I will not bore you with the rest. But my experience led me to contemplate on the prevalence in our day and age of apologizing for speaking the Truth.

Indeed, it is all too common, this habit of apologizing for the Truth. Take the Archdiocese of Toronto, for instance. Its policy of silence in light of, say, OECTA's promotion of sodomy on the lawns of Queen's Park, is itself an apology. Their refusal to say it is wrong to use the "Catholic" label to promote active sodomy - one of the four sins which cry to Heaven for vengeance - and instead resort to silence, saying nothing at all about it, is disturbing. It is almost as though the Archdiocese is embarrassed for holding the Truth, and wants to simply be on good terms with everyone.

Have the Church hierarchy - here and elsewhere - succumbed to the vice of human respect, conforming to the world instead of asking the world to conform to Her? It certainly seems so.

Our Lord Himself said that if we wish to follow Him, we must be prepared for contention and enmity with the world, especially when that world includes our own family members. Following Our Lord is not a life of comfort and ease. It is a path of life which will include much hardship and suffering, a reality Our Lord Himself affirmed during His time on Earth. Not just from the Jews in Jerusalem, as we heard in Sunday's Gospel, but also the Jews in Nazareth, and other places.

Our Lord could have easily softened His tone. But because He knew people would not accept Him and that the Truth could not be compromised at any cost, He refused to do so. Ultimately, it cost Him His life, a life He willingly gave up for us.

In a heartbeat, all of us would answer this post's titular question with a resounding "No." But, in practice, we would find it difficult to maintain that "No." I certainly do. Most of us would find it incredibly difficult to give up the lives of comfort we live - in whatever form that takes - for the sake of the Truth. This is what seems to be afflicting the Archdiocese of Toronto, to its shame.

Let's do better than that. Let us imitate the saints we admire so much - nay, our Lord Himself!


Sunday, 7 April 2019

Passion Sunday


The holy Church begins her night Office of this Sunday with these impressive words of the royal prophet. Formerly, the faithful considered it their duty to assist at the night Office, at least on Sundays and feasts; they would have grieved to lose the grand teachings given by the liturgy. Such fervour has long since died out; the assiduity at the Offices of the Church, which was the joy of our Catholic forefathers, has now become a thing of the past; and even in countries which have not apostatized from the faith, the clergy have ceased to celebrate publicly Offices at which no one assisted. Excepting in cathedral churches and in monasteries, the grand harmonious system of the divine praise has been abandoned, and the marvellous power of the liturgy has no longer its full influence upon the faithful. 
This is our reason for drawing the attention of our readers to certain beauties of the Divine Office, which would otherwise be totally ignored. Thus, what can be more impressive than this solemn Invitatory of to-day’s Matins, which the Church takes from one of the psalms, and which she repeats on every feria between this and Maundy Thursday? She says; To-day, if ye will hear the voice of the Lord, harden not your hearts! The sweet voice of your suffering Jesus now speaks to you, poor sinners! be not your own enemies by indifference and hardness of heart. The Son of God is about to give you the last and greatest proof of the love that brought Him down from heaven; His death is nigh at hand: men are preparing the wood for the immolation of the new Isaac: enter into yourselves, and let not your hearts, after being touched with grace, return to their former obduracy; for nothing could be more dangerous. The great anniversaries we are to celebrate have a renovating power for those souls that faithfully correspond with the grace which is offered them; but they increase insensibility in those who let them pass without working their conversion. To-day, therefore, if you hear the voice of the Lord, harden not your hearts! 
During the preceding four weeks, we have noticed how the malice of Jesus’ enemies has been gradually increasing. His very presence irritates them; and it is evident that any little circumstance will suffice to bring the deep and long-nurtured hatred to a head. The kind and gentle manners of Jesus are drawing to Him all hearts that are simple and upright; at the same time, the humble life He leads, and the stern purity of His doctrines, are perpetual sources of vexation and anger, both to the proud Jew that looks forward to the Messias being a mighty conqueror, and to the pharisee, who corrupts the Law of God, that he may make it the instrument of his own base passions. Still, Jesus goes on working miracles; His discourses are more than ever energetic; His prophecies foretell the fall of Jerusalem, and such a destruction of its famous temple, that not a stone is to be left on a stone. The doctors of the Law should, at least, reflect upon what they hear; they should examine these wonderful works, which render such strong testimony in favour of the Son of David; and they should consult these divine prophecies which, up to the present time, have been so literally fulfilled in His person. Alas! they themselves are about to carry them out to the very last iota. There is not a single outrage or suffering foretold by David and Isaias, as having to be put upon the Messias, which these blind men are not scheming to verify. 
In them, therefore, was fulfilled that terrible saying: ‘He that shall speak against the Holy Ghost, it shall not be forgiven him, neither in this world, nor in the world to come.' [St. Matt. xii. 32.] The Synagogue is nigh to a curse. Obstinate in her error, she refuses to see or to hear; she has deliberately perverted her judgment: she has extinguished within herself the light of the holy Spirit; she will go deeper and deeper into evil, and at length fall into the abyss. This same lamentable conduct is but too often witnessed nowadays in those sinners, who, by habitual resistance to the light, end by finding their happiness in sin. Neither should it surprise us, that we find in people of our own generation a resemblance to the murderers of our Jesus: the history of His Passion will reveal to us many sad secrets of the human heart and its perverse inclinations; for what happened in Jerusalem, happens also in every sinner’s heart. His heart, according to the saying of St. Paul, is a Calvary, where Jesus is crucified. There is the same ingratitude, the same blindness, the same wild madness, with this difference: that the sinner who is enlightened by faith, knows Him whom he crucifies; whereas the Jews, as the same apostle tells us, knew not the Lord of glory [1 Cor. ii. 8.] Whilst, therefore, we listen to the Gospel, which relates the history of the Passion, let us turn the indignation which we feel for the Jews against ourselves and our own sins; let us weep over the sufferings of our Victim, for our sins caused Him to suffer and die. 
Everything around us urges us to mourn. The images of the saints, the very crucifix on our altar, are veiled from our sight. The Church is oppressed with grief. During the first four weeks of Lent, she compassionated her Jesus fasting in the desert; His coming sufferings and crucifixion and death are what now fill her with anguish. We read in to-day’s Gospel, that the Jews threaten to stone the Son of God as a blasphemer: but His hour is not yet come. He is obliged to flee and hide Himself. It is to express this deep humiliation, that the Church veils the cross. A God hiding Himself, that He may evade the anger of men - what a mystery! Is it weakness? Is it, that He fears death? No; we shall soon see Him going out to meet His enemies: but at present He hides Himself from them, because all that had been prophesied regarding Him has not been fulfilled. Besides, His death is not to be by stoning: He is to die upon a cross, the tree of malediction, which, from that time forward, is to be the tree of life. Let us humble ourselves, as we see the Creator of heaven and earth thus obliged to hide Himself from men, who are bent on His destruction! Let us go back, in thought, to the sad day of the first sin, when Adam and Eve bid themselves because a guilty conscience told them they were naked. Jesus has come to assure us of our being pardoned, and lo! He hides Himself, not because He is naked - He that is to the saints the garb of holiness and immortality - but because He made Himself weak, that He might make us strong. Our first parents sought to hide themselves from the sight of God; Jesus hides Himself from the eye of men. But it will not be thus for ever. The day will come when sinners, from whose anger He now flees, will pray to the mountains to fall on them and shield them from His gaze; but their prayer will not be granted, and they shall see the Son of Man coming in the clouds of heaven, with much power and majesty [St. Matt. xxiv. 30].
This Sunday is called Passion Sunday, because the Church begins, on this day, to make the sufferings of our Redeemer her chief thought. It is called also, Judica, from the first word of the Introit of the Mass; and again Neomania, that is, the Sunday of the new (or the Easter) moon, because it always falls after the new moon which regulates the feast of Easter. 
In the Greek Church, this Sunday goes under the simple name of the fifth Sunday of the holy fast.
From Dom Prosper Gueranger's commentary on Passion Sunday in the Liturgical Year. 

Saturday, 6 April 2019

The Archdiocese of Regina issues an outstanding condemnation of abuse. When will the Archdiocese of Toronto do the same?

Archdiocese of Regina website
05 March 2019
Alt
This letter is to all of you who have been wounded through clergy sexual abuse: to those whose abuse was at the hands of a parish priest, a pastor, a member of a religious community; and to those who were abused at what was then known as an Indian residential school. It is addressed to those of you who have left the church, those who have been cast aside, those who have found a home in another faith community or spiritual tradition, and those who remain in the Catholic Church.
Over the past two years I have had the opportunity to meet with some of you who were hurt deeply by the church, and have learned of the tragic legacy of clergy sexual abuse in our Archdiocese. I have also heard from victims who had come forward, had not been welcomed by church leaders, and who were left to experience more shame, guilt, and a door closed to healing. Many have chosen not to relate their experience to anyone and have buried their secret deep within them.
To each of you, and to all the people of the Archdiocese, this letter is an invitation to a healing journey, a journey that needs to involve the entire church. To those of you no longer in the church, but whose healing is bound up with the church’s healing, and indeed to each victim wherever you are on the path to healing, we extend an offer to accompany you on this journey in ways that are helpful to you. At the outset, I want to express on behalf of the church how deeply sorry we are that you have been wounded in this way. That should never have happened to you.
It is our hope and desire to be able to walk with you, the victim. To do so, we need to begin by being honest about what happened to you, what you suffered, the gravity of what was done to you, and the further suffering you experienced when the church’s response to you was not welcoming or compassionate.
As members of the one human family, we are all connected; what happens to one person impacts others. Christian faith speaks of a deeper relationship still, which holds us to an even higher standard. St. Paul tells us that when one member of the body suffers, all suffer; when one person is wounded, all are wounded. But you who have been abused have not experienced that solidarity, and these words may themselves be a source of pain and frustration. All of us, in our parishes and in church leadership, are deeply connected. All of us share this shame. It is not enough to identify those who abused and those who dealt irresponsibly or poorly with that abuse. All of us are called to repentance and to the work of healing.
Your wounds, so painful and so slow to heal, point to our wounds of contradiction and unfaithfulness. As a community of faith, we were called to bring you into a place of light, but instead you were brought into a place of darkness. Members of the clergy, who were called to affirm your worth and dignity as a beloved child of God, eroded that dignity. Bishops, members of the clergy, and the entire church, have the responsibility to make our churches safe places, prayerful places.  Instead your vulnerability was exploited. When families of victims called us to take action, we reacted defensively, protecting the clergy and showing greater concern for the church’s public image than for you, who by our action and inaction were marginalized and silenced. Your pain was often intensified by not being acknowledged, by being hidden and swept away, as we tried to protect the reputation of the church.
How far we have strayed from the heart of our faith, from our God who in Jesus was himself victimized. He calls us from the cross to walk with victims, to serve those who are wounded and to spend ourselves in striving to bring healing and compassion.  How badly are we ourselves in need of the conversion to which we call others.
Today, Ash Wednesday, on behalf of all of the people of this Archdiocese, I turn to you, victims of clergy sexual abuse, to express our lament and great regret for what we have done to you. For the abuse you suffered, the brutal experience you were forced to endure when still in your childhood or adolescence, we are sincerely and profoundly sorry. For the shame, confusion and guilt you experienced then and in the years since the acts of abuse, we are sorry.
For the times when the church has slammed the door on you, not wanting to hear your painful truth, not wanting to face the scourge of abuse, we are sorry. For our failures in acknowledging our transgressions, for collusion in covering up what happened and for silencing victims, we are sorry. For our misuse of power, and for the clericalism which helped to create a context wherein abuse was allowed to happen and be covered up, we are sorry.
We also want to acknowledge those victims who are no longer with us – for whom this letter has come too late.  To friends and family members, we are profoundly sorry for any part we played in their pain, despair and loss of hope.
To those of you whose abuse took place in the Catholic administered residential schools in the Archdiocese, we express our great sorrow at what was done to you. The abuse you suffered was linked to racism, and was often combined with a disrespect for your culture, language and spirituality. The Truth and Reconciliation process has helped to bring to light the waves of suffering which you experienced. While we as church are seeking in other contexts to address the negative aftermath of residential schools, the generational trauma, and effects of colonization, in this letter we address in a specific way those who were victims of clergy sexual abuse. As with those victimized in other contexts, you suffered because of a distorted use of power. Instead of authority being at the service of building up, teaching, giving dignity, it was used in a way which assaulted your very being. We are profoundly sorry for what happened to you, and stand before the Creator asking that we might now find a way to take steps of healing and reconciliation.
Apologizing is not enough. It is only a starting point.  We want to make our apology real by making changes which prevent others from being abused and by taking steps so that your encounters with the church today are experiences of healing and compassion.  We have a long journey ahead.
We commit ourselves to put the necessary structures in place so that you can safely come forward and tell your story. We commit ourselves to walk with you and accompany you in ways that you find helpful, prioritizing your needs and your healing. We have learned much from victims, and commit ourselves to continue to listen to you, and to seek your guidance as we revise our safe environment protocol and create policies and take initiatives at the service of greater accountability and transparency. We commit ourselves to a far-reaching strategy for educating and forming all ministers, organizations and parishes in the archdiocese, so that the church might be a place where children, youth and vulnerable people are safe, valued, and welcomed, and where we respond quickly and effectively when challenges arise. We will continue to host services for victims of clergy sexual abuse in our parishes, and to open our doors to victims whenever they come forward. We are establishing a lay review board to address any new allegation brought forward, will offer support when victims make the decision to go to the police, and will partner with others who can assist victims on a path of healing. We will invite our parishes and people to look for ways to listen to you, to walk with you, and to embrace the challenge of dealing honestly and faithfully with our past failures, as we strive by God’s grace to do our part in building a church that is a safe, welcoming and life-giving place for all.
In conclusion, I want to express my profound gratitude to the victims who have helped to discern what needed to be said in this letter, and who have been guides in leading the church as we learn to walk with other victims. We value deeply the insights that you have shared, and have come to know that listening to victims is crucial at each step of the way. We want all victims, those outside the church and those within, to know that we recognize your suffering, your courage and the deep betrayal of your trust.  Moving forward, we promise to be open to hearing your truth.
Jesus told his disciples that what is in the dark must be brought into the light, and that the truth will set us free. I would ask the people of the Archdiocese to join me, drawing on all the resources, grace and strength which our merciful God gives us, in accompanying victims on this journey of healing. May we reach out to all that have been deeply scarred, be present to those carrying the darkness of clergy sexual abuse, and sow seeds of new life. May the community of disciples who find life in him follow him more faithfully, that we may be a source of healing, hope, and blessing for those whom we have wounded, and for the world in which we live.
Donald Bolen
Archdiocese of Regina
Pulled from Sylvia's Site